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Research Papers: Oil/Gas Reservoirs

Experimental Study and Application of Steam Flooding for Horizontal Well in Ultraheavy Oil Reservoirs

[+] Author and Article Information
Pengcheng Liu

School of Energy Resources,
China University of Geosciences (Beijing),
Beijing 100083, China
e-mail: liupengcheng8883@sohu.com

Hemei Zheng

School of Energy Resources,
China University of Geosciences (Beijing),
Beijing 100083, China

Guanhuan Wu

Research Institute of Petroleum
Exploration and Development,
Shengli Oil Field,
SINOPEC,
Dongying 257098, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received December 8, 2015; final manuscript received November 7, 2016; published online November 29, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Arash Dahi Taleghani.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(1), 012908 (Nov 29, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: JERT-15-1469; doi: 10.1115/1.4035254 History: Received December 08, 2015; Revised November 07, 2016

Based on the ultraheavy oil area in AL-1 Block, Shengli Oilfield, China, a two-dimensional (2D) high-temperature–high-pressure (HTHP) visualized scaled physical simulation system was constructed to investigate intensively oil displacement mechanisms underlying steam flooding for horizontal well at different development stages. The results indicated that whole process is divided into three phases: water extraction phase, steam effective displacement phase, and steam breakthrough phase. Different phases have different oil displacement mechanisms. These differences are caused mainly by the synthetic actions of horizontal displacement and vertical drainage. A series of physical experiments were conducted to evaluate the optimal parameters affecting the development effects of steam flooding for horizontal wells. The results indicated that the development effect at the pressure of 5 MPa is better than that at 7 MPa when the steam dryness at the bottom of the well was 0.6; the steam dryness at the bottom should be kept above 0.4; the steam chamber was fully expanded at the injected intensity of steam of 1.9 ton/(d. ha. m). Increasing steam dryness under high-pressure conditions can facilitate an effective development. The results were successfully used to guide 18 horizontal wells from AL-1 Block, and the data collected here may provide important guidance for steam flooding in heavy or ultraheavy oil reservoir.

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Topics: Floods , Steam , Reservoirs , Water
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Figures

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Fig. 1

External appearance of the 2D HTHP physical simulation system

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Fig. 2

Internal schematic diagram of the 2D HTHP physical simulation system: (a) internal stereogram of physical simulation system and (b) sectional profile of the physical simulation

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the vertical temperature field and production parameters at the different phases: (a) contrastive pictures of the change in the vertical temperature field and (b) oil production rate and water cut with respect to the time

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Fig. 4

Comparison of the vertical temperature field and production parameters at pressures of 7 MPa and 5 MPa: (a) contrastive pictures of the change in the vertical temperature field and (b) oil production rate and water cut with respect to the time

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Comparisons of the vertical temperature field and production parameters at different levels of steam dryness at the well bottom: (a) contrastive pictures of the change in the vertical temperature field and (b) oil production rate and water cut with respect to the time

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Fig. 6

Contrastive pictures of the change in the vertical temperature field at the different injected intensities of steam

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Fig. 7

Contrastive pictures of the change in the vertical temperature field at different pressures and levels of steam dryness at the well bottom

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