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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Use of Computational Combustion in the Development and Design of Energy-Efficient Household Cooker-Top Burners

[+] Author and Article Information
İ. Bedii Özdemir

Professor and Head of Fluids Group
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,
İstanbul Technical University,
Gumussuyu,
İstanbul 34437, Turkey
e-mail: bozdemir@itu.edu.tr

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 2, 2016; final manuscript received November 7, 2016; published online November 29, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Reza Sheikhi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(2), 022206 (Nov 29, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1358; doi: 10.1115/1.4035256 History: Received September 02, 2016; Revised November 07, 2016

In order to design energy efficient cooker-top burners, the stabilization mechanisms of partially premixed flames were investigated. Different design features are assessed with the identical fuel (CH4), fuel flow rate, and load vessel arrangement, but with different levels of primary aeration and flame delivery. k–ε Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) simulations are performed using the modified temperature-composition pdf method and the intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (ILDM) reduction scheme. The results show that the optimum value of the angle of flame delivery is about 30–35 deg. The contact area of the flame cup under the bottom surface depends on the diameter of the burner head which determines the separation of the flames. The traditional solution to reduce the port separations, which is to increase the number of ports, is shown to cause weak flames which extinguish in shorter distances and can have strong tendency to blow off. It also causes significant pressure resistance ahead of the contraction tube and so impairs the primary aeration. In the present study, a new slot profile, named the double-V form, is proposed and shown to be very effective in reducing the gaps between the flames, without creating any further pressure resistance.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The burner head for: (a) burner-1, (b) burner-2, and (c) burner-3

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Fig. 2

Slot with double-V shaped cross section

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Fig. 3

The diametrical section of the 3D computational domain

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Fig. 4

Streamlines on the diametrical plane for: (a) burner-1, (b) burner-2, and (c) burner-3

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Fig. 5

Mixture fraction distribution on the diametrical plane for: (a) burner-1, (b) burner-2, and (c) burner-3

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Fig. 6

Temperature (K) distribution on the diametrical plane for: (a) burner-1, (b) burner-2, and (c) burner-3

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Fig. 7

Distribution of CO2 mass fractions on the diametrical plane for: (a) burner-1, (b) burner-2, and (c) burner-3

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Fig. 8

Distribution of H2O mass fractions on the diametrical plane for: (a) burner-1, (b) burner-2, and (c) burner-3

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