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Technical Brief

Experimental Study of Operation Stability of a Spark Ignition Engine Fueled With Coal Bed Gas

[+] Author and Article Information
Lei Chen

Liaoning Key Laboratory of Advanced Measurement
and Test Technology for Aviation Propulsion System,
Shenyang Aerospace University,
Shenyang 110136, China;
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116023, China

Peng Song

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116023, China;
College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering,
Dalian Nationalities University,
Dalian 116600, China
e-mail: 20143625@qq.com

Wuqiang Long, Liyan Feng, Yang Wang

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Dalian University of Technology,
Dalian 116023, China

Jing Zhang

Liaoning Key Laboratory of Advanced Measurement and
Test Technology for Aviation Propulsion System,
Shenyang Aerospace University,
Shenyang 110136, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Internal Combustion Engine Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received May 6, 2016; final manuscript received August 26, 2016; published online April 17, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Dr. Avinash Kumar Agarwal.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(4), 044501 (Apr 17, 2017) (5 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1205; doi: 10.1115/1.4035427 History: Received May 06, 2016; Revised August 26, 2016

Experimental research has been carried out on a single cylinder naturally aspirated spark ignition engine which was modified to operate with coal-bed gas fuel to investigate the method of improving operation stability and lean burn limit. Varied fuel composition with methane concentration 30–100% and CO2 volumetric fraction 0–0.7 was employed to simulate coal-bed methane (CBM) and coal mined methane (CMM), respectively. Hydrogen was then employed to improve operational stability and lean burn limit. The results show that a stable operation range of the engine was obtained under most of the fuel compositions even if up to CO2 volumetric fraction = 0.6 was employed. Besides lean burn limit, the unstable operation with COVIMEP > 10% only appears at lean burn limit as well as CO2 volumetric fraction = 0.7 at each equivalence ratio. The lean burn limit of coal-bed gas has been significantly enlarged from the equivalence ratio equals to 0.6–0.4 by hydrogen addition. Stable operation with COVIMEP < 5% at the equivalence ratio equals to 0.4 has also been obtained at some high hydrogen concentration conditions. Hydrogen addition induced the reduction of both carbon monoxide (CO) and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions at all equivalence ratio conditions, especially at the equivalence ratio equals to 0.4 and 0.6. CO2 addition improves NOx emission significantly; however, high CO2 volumetric fraction will lead to unstable operation, which results in deteriorated CO and THC emissions. Hydrogen addition has benefits of improving operation stability and enlarging lean burn limit of coal-bed gas engine, which has practical significance to improve the application of coal-bed gas engine technology.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Yearly coal-bed methane exploitation of China

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Fig. 2

Effect of equivalence ratio on BMEP, brake thermal efficiency, and COVIMEP of methane as the single fuel

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Fig. 3

Effect of CO2 volume fraction on brake thermal efficiency

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Fig. 4

Effect of CO2 volume fraction on COVIMEP

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Fig. 5

Scatter diagram of IMEP within continuous 135 cycles

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Fig. 6

Effect of hydrogen addition and CO2 dilution on brake thermal efficiency

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Fig. 7

Effect of hydrogen addition and CO2 dilution on COVIMEP

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Fig. 8

Scatter diagram of IMEP within 135 cycles with hydrogen addition

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Fig. 9

Effect of fuel component on exhaust emissions

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