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Research Papers: Alternative Energy Sources

Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Solar Chimney

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohammad Raghib Shakeel

Mechanical Engineering Department,
College of Engineering,
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: raghib@kfupm.edu.sa

Jihad Al-Sadah

Physics Department,
College of Science,
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals,
KFUPM,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: jhalsadah@kfupm.edu.sa

Esmail M. A. Mokheimer

Mechanical Engineering Department,
College of Engineering,
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals,
P.O. Box 279,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia;
Center of Research Excellence
in Renewable Energy (CoRERE),
King Fahd University of Petroleum
and Minerals (KFUPM),
P.O. Box 279,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: esmailm@kfupm.edu.sa

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received November 22, 2016; final manuscript received January 2, 2017; published online February 8, 2017. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(3), 031201 (Feb 08, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1471; doi: 10.1115/1.4035782 History: Received November 22, 2016; Revised January 02, 2017

Solar chimney or Trombe wall has been studied numerically and analytically. Analytical results available in the literature overestimate air flow rate by 46–97%. While insulated walls are used in the experiments, there might still be loss from the chimney walls, which is not usually considered in the available analytical models. It is found that the overestimation of air flow rate can be reduced to 3–14% by including heat losses from the glass and wall side of the chimney in the analytical model. The presently developed numerical model is validated against experimental data from literature. The conditions within which the analytical solution can give good approximate results regarding the air volume flow rate have been identified and discussed. We found that the analytical method simulates solar chimneys well for gap widths of up to 0.3 m and incident radiation above 500 W/m2. The present numerical results revealed that the optimum value of chimney gap width that maximizes the induced flow through the chimney is 0.3 m.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of a typical solar chimney

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of solar chimney for: (a) heating and ventilation (in winter) and (b) ventilation (in summer)

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Fig. 3

Physical model of solar chimney

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Fig. 4

Thermal circuit for the solar chimney [10]

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Fig. 5

Comparison between experimental and numerical volume flow rate

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Fig. 6

Comparison between experimental [30] and numericaldimensionless temperature distribution at 0.523 m above chimney inlet for wall flux of 400 W/m2

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Fig. 7

Comparison between experimental [30] and numericaldimensionless temperature distribution at 0.523 m above chimney inlet for wall flux of 600 W/m2

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Fig. 8

Numerical and experimental [30] air volume flow rate comparison

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Fig. 9

Gap width optimization for 500 W/m2 solar radiation

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Fig. 10

Streamlines of flow at 500 W/m2 for gap width of: (a) 0.3 m and (b) 0.8 m

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Fig. 11

Volume flow rate versus the incident radiation

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Fig. 12

Streamlines of the flow at: (a) 400 W/m2 and (b) 800 W/m2

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Fig. 13

Temperature of glass, wall and air at outlet

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