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Technical Brief

The Effect of Different Drilling Fluids on Mechanical Friction

[+] Author and Article Information
Jan David Ytrehus, Ali Taghipour

Sintef Petroleum AS,
Trondheim 7465, Norway

Arash Golchin, Braham Prakash

Division of Machine Elements,
Luleå University of Technology,
Luleå SE-971 87, Sweden

Arild Saasen

Dept. Petroleum Engineering,
University of Stavanger,
Stavanger 4036, Norway

1Present address: Department of Petroleum Technology, University of Stavanger, Stavanger 4036, Norway.

Contributed by the Petroleum Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 15, 2016; final manuscript received January 16, 2017; published online February 24, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Arash Dahi Taleghani.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(3), 034502 (Feb 24, 2017) (6 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1176; doi: 10.1115/1.4035951 History: Received April 15, 2016; Revised January 16, 2017

A very important aspect in highly inclined wellbores is the mechanical friction. For extended reach drilling (ERD) and through tubing extended reach drilling (TTERD) this can be a limiting factor. Friction caused by the contact between the drill string and the well casing or borehole is dependent on the drilling weight and fluid properties. Drilling fluids play an important role in determining mechanical friction. The use of oil-based drilling fluids with higher lubricity can reduce torque and drag behavior and minimize stick and slip. Reducing mechanical friction will improve drilling efficiency in general, and will in particular enable longer reach for ERD wells. This paper presents results from experimental laboratory tests where the mechanical friction has been investigated. Friction behavior was investigated for different drilling fluids; water-based and oil-based drilling fluids both with and without solid particles. A pin on disk setup was used for these experiments where a spherical ended steel pin was slid against a rotating disk made of granite. The test results show that the mechanical friction in general is smaller with oil-based than water-based drilling fluids in the presence of solid particles.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Drill string forces in different wellbore sections (K&M Technology Group)

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Fig. 2

The pin on disk test configuration

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Fig. 3

Friction coefficient with various lubricants during the test time. Normal load: 10 N, sand particles: No.

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Fig. 4

Friction coefficient with various lubricants during the test time. Normal load: 5 N, sand particles: No.

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Fig. 5

Friction coefficient with various lubricants during the test time. Normal load: 2.3 N, sand particles: No.

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Fig. 6

Friction coefficient with various lubricants during the test time. Normal load: 2.3 N, sand particles: Yes.

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Fig. 7

Friction coefficient for bentonite (clay) fluid at various loads. Sand particles are present for one test at 2.3 N.

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Fig. 8

Friction coefficient for WARP fluid at various loads. Sand particles are present for one test at 2.3 N.

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Fig. 9

Friction coefficient for Versatec fluid at various loads. Sand particles are present for one test at 2.3 N.

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Fig. 10

Friction coefficient for base oil EDC 99DW at various loads. Sand particles are present for one test at 2.3 N.

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Fig. 11

Friction coefficient for base oil (EDC 95-11) at various loads. Sand particles are present for one test at 2.3 N.

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Fig. 12

Friction coefficient for all fluids. Test duration: 1 h, normal load: 10 N.

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