0
Research Papers: Energy Conversion/Systems

Production Cost–Efficiency Relation for Room Air Conditioners and Its Economic and Environmental Impact

[+] Author and Article Information
Esmail M. A. Mokheimer

Mem. ASME
Mechanical Engineering Department,
College of Engineering,
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals
(KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia;
Center of Research Excellence in Energy
Efficiency (CEEE),
King Fahd University of Petroleum
and Minerals (KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia;
Center of Research Excellence in Renewable
Energy (CoRe-RE),
King Fahd University of Petroleum and
Minerals (KFUPM),
P.O. Box 279,
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: esmailm@kfupm.edu.sa

Syed Hussain

Dhahran Techno-Valley (DTV),
King Fahd University of Petroleum and
Minerals (KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: syed.hussain@dtvc.com.sa

Magd DinAli Nadeem

Mechanical Engineering Department,
College of Engineering,
King Fahd University of Petroleum and
Minerals (KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: s201194130@kfupm.edu.sa

Ahmed Ali Mahmoud Abdulrahman

Mechanical Engineering Department,
College of Engineering,
King Fahd University of Petroleum and
Minerals (KFUPM),
Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
e-mail: s201264040@kfupm.edu.sa

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 12, 2017; final manuscript received June 3, 2017; published online July 27, 2017. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(6), 061601 (Jul 27, 2017) (17 pages) Paper No: JERT-17-1160; doi: 10.1115/1.4037206 History: Received April 12, 2017; Revised June 03, 2017

A large amount of the operating costs in a building is determined by the energy requirements of its air conditioning system. The demand for more energy efficient units desired by both manufacturers and the consumers results in a dire necessity to have air conditioning units that are more energy efficient than the existing ones. In order to achieve the abovementioned features, a tool must be designed to simulate the thermal behavior of the air conditioners. In this work, a mathematical model is developed for air conditioning units and coded into a computer program to estimate the overall performance, as indicated by the unit energy efficiency ratio (EER). The main objective is to maximize the unit EER by proposing modifications or enhancements in the existing unit and to study the economics of these modifications based on the measured terms such as the energy savings and the operating cost. Finally, the effect of the proposed design modifications on the economy and environment at the national level in Saudi Arabia is estimated and presented as an example.

Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Electricity generation over a decade in Saudi Arabia [2]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of a typical air conditioner

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

A schematic representation of the condenser

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Flow chart of the simulation model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Temperature-entropy (T-s) diagram for an actual vapor compression cycle

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Effect of condenser face area on the AC performance (package unit I)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Effect of evaporator face area on the AC performance (package unit I)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Effect of condenser volume flow rate (CFM) on the AC performance (package unit I)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Effect of evaporator volume flow rate (CFM) on the AC performance (package unit I)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Effect of compressor EER on the AC performance (package unit I)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Effect of condenser face area on AC performance (split unit II)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Effect of evaporator face area on AC performance (split unit II)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Effect of condenser volume flow rate on the AC performance (split unit II)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Effect of evaporator volume flow rate on the AC performance (split unit II)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Effect of compressor EER on AC performance (split unit II)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Effect of condenser face area on AC performance (window unit III)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Effect of evaporator face area on AC performance (window unit III)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Effect of condenser volume flow rate on AC performance (window unit III)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Effect of evaporator volume flow rate on AC performance (window unit III)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Effect of compressor EER on AC performance (window unit III)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Cost curve relating the increase in cost to increase in EER (package unit I)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 22

Cost curve relating to increase in cost to increase in EER (split unit II)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 23

Cost curve relating the increase in cost to increase in EER (window unit III)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In