0
Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Characteristic Analysis of a Rotary Regenerative Type Catalytic Combustion Reactor for Ultra Low Calorific Value Gas

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhenkun Sang

Key Laboratory of Power Machinery
and Engineering,
Ministry of Education,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dong Chuan Road,
Minhang District,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: goosang@sjtu.edu.cn

Zemin Bo

Key Laboratory of Power Machinery
and Engineering,
Ministry of Education,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dong Chuan Road,
Minhang District,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: rightbo123@sjtu.edu.cn

Xing Liu

Key Laboratory of Power Machinery
and Engineering,
Ministry of Education,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dong Chuan Road,
Minhang District,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: liuxing1992@sjtu.edu.cn

YiwuWeng

Key Laboratory of Power Machinery
and Engineering,
Ministry of Education,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
800 Dong Chuan Road,
Minhang District,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: ywweng@sjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 25, 2016; final manuscript received July 26, 2017; published online September 18, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Ashwani K. Gupta.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 139(6), 062208 (Sep 18, 2017) (7 pages) Paper No: JERT-16-1307; doi: 10.1115/1.4037481 History: Received July 25, 2016; Revised July 26, 2017

In order to eliminate pollution from ultra low calorific value gas (ULCVG) of methane and achieve energy recovery simultaneously, a novel reactor with the function of regenerator and catalytic combustor named rotary regenerative type catalytic combustion reactor is studied. The reactor walls which store and reject heat alternatively can preheat incoming ULCVG to the ignition temperature of methane, and catalytic combustion occurs rapidly. According to the features of the reactor such as rotation and catalytic combustion, considering the conjugate heat exchange, the characteristics of this reactor were calculated and analyzed with the help of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The results show that the ULCVG can be oxidized as a primary fuel, with the methane conversion above 91%, and the feasibility of this reactor is proved in theory. The reactor can continuously generate high-temperature gas (1035 K–1200 K) which can be used by the heat consumption unit (HCU) such as turbines, boilers, and solid oxide fuel cell services. Besides, the outlet gas and exhaust gas temperature vary roughly linearly with time, and this rule is useful to estimate the outlet temperature. Periodical rotation not only provides high-temperature zone which is beneficial to catalytic combustion, but also avoids further heat accumulation.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Yusuf, R. O. , Noor, Z. Z. , Abba, A. H. , Hassan, M. A. A. , and Din, M. F. M. , 2012, “ Methane Emission by Sectors: A Comprehensive Review of Emission Sources and Mitigation Methods,” Renewable Sustainable Energy Rev., 16(7), pp. 5059–5070. [CrossRef]
Karakurt, I. , Aydin, G. , and Aydiner, K. , 2011, “ Mine Ventilation Air Methane as a Sustainable Energy Source,” Renewable Sustainable Energy Rev., 15(2), pp. 1042–1049. [CrossRef]
Chen, L. , Song, P. , Long, W. , Feng, Ly. , Zhang, J. , and Wang, Y. , 2017, “ Experimental Study of Operation Stability of a Spark Ignition Engine Fueled With Coal Bed Gas,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 139(4), p. 044501. [CrossRef]
Ferreira, S. B. , and Pilidis, P. , 2001, “ Comparison of Externally Fired and Internal Combustion Gas Turbines Using Biomass Gas,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 123(4), pp. 291–296. [CrossRef]
Su, S. , Beath, A. , Guo, H. , and Mallett, C. , 2005, “ An Assessment of Mine Methane Mitigation and Utilisation Technologies,” Prog. Energy Combust. Sci., 31(2), pp. 123–170. [CrossRef]
Warmuzinski, K. , 2008, “ Harnessing Methane Emissions From Coal Mining,” Process Saf. Environ. Prot., 86(5), pp. 315–320. [CrossRef]
Spadaccini, C. M. , Peck, J. , and Waitz, I . A. , 2007, “ Catalytic Combustion Systems for Microscale Gas Turbines,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 129(1), pp. 49–60.
Ralph, A. D. , Betta, J. C. S. , and David, K. Y. , 1995, “ Catalytic Combustion Technology to Achieve Ultra Low NOx, Emissions: Catalyst Design and Performance Characteristics,” Catal. Today, 26(3–4), pp. 329–335.
Arai, M. , Amagai, K. , and Mogi, T. , 2001, “ Catalytic Combustion of Pre-Vaporized Liquid Fuel,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 123(1), pp. 44–49. [CrossRef]
Boehman, A. L. , Simons, J. W. , Niksa, S. J. , and McCarty, J. G. , 1997, “ Dynamic Stress Behavior in Catalytic Combustors,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 119(3), pp. 164–170. [CrossRef]
Su, S. , and Yu, X. , 2015, “ A 25 kWe Low Concentration Methane Catalytic Combustion Gas Turbine Prototype Unit,” Energy, 79, pp. 428–438. [CrossRef]
Yin, J. , Weng, Y. W. , and Zhu, J. Q. , 2015, “ Numerical and Experimental Investigation on the Performance of Lean Burn Catalytic Combustion for Gas Turbine Application,” J. Therm. Sci., 24(2), pp. 185–193. [CrossRef]
Su, S. , and Agnew, J. , 2006, “ Catalytic Combustion of Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane,” Fuel, 85(9), pp. 1201–1210. [CrossRef]
Carroni, R. , and Griffin, T. , 2010, “ Catalytic, Hybrid Lean Combustion for Gas Turbines,” Catal. Today, 155(1), pp. 2–12. [CrossRef]
Skiepko, T. , and Shah, R. K. , 2004, “ A Comparison of Rotary Regenerator theory and Experimental Results for an Air Preheater for a Thermal Power Plant,” Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci., 28(2), pp. 257–264. [CrossRef]
Wilson, D. G. , and Ballou, J. M. , 2006, “ Design and Performance of a High-Temperature Regenerator Having Very High Effectiveness, Low Leakage and Negligible Seal Wear,” ASME Paper No. GT2006-90095.
Hua, J. , Wu, M. , and Kumar, K. , 2005, “ Numerical Simulation of the Combustion of Hydrogen–Air Mixture in Micro-Scaled Chambers—Part I: Fundamental Study,” Chem. Eng. Sci., 60(13), pp. 3497–3506. [CrossRef]
Deng, X. W. , Xiong, Y. , Yin, H. , and Gao, Q. S. , 2016, “ Numerical Study of the Effect of Nozzle Configurations on Characteristics of MILD Combustion for Gas Turbine Application,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 138(4), p. 042212. [CrossRef]
Martinez, D. M. , Cluff, D. L. , and Jiang, X. , 2014, “ Numerical Investigation of the Burning Characteristics of Ventilation Air Methane in a Combustion Based Mitigation System,” Fuel, 133, pp. 182–193. [CrossRef]
Benedetto, A. D. , Sarli, V. D. , and Russo, G. , 2010, “ Effect of Geometry on the Thermal Behavior of Catalytic Micro-Combustors,” Catal. Today, 155(1–2), pp. 116–122. [CrossRef]
Mazumder, S. , 2007, “ Modeling Full-Scale Monolithic Catalytic Converters: Challenges and Possible Solutions,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 129(4), pp. 526–535. [CrossRef]
Ohadi, M. M. , and Buckley, S. G. , 2001, “ High Temperature Heat Exchangers and Microscale Combustion Systems: Applications to Thermal System Miniaturization,” Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci., 25(5), pp. 207–217. [CrossRef]
Mazumder, S. , and Grimm, M. , 2007, “ Numerical Investigation of Radiation Effects in Catalytic Combustion,” ASME Paper No. HT2007-32460.
Deutschmann, O. , Schmidt, R. , Behrendt, F. , and Warnatz, J. , 1996, “ Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Ignition,” Symp. (Int.) Combust., 26(1), pp. 1747–1754. [CrossRef]
Hayes, R. E. , and Kolaczkowski, S. T. , 1999, “ A Study of Nusselt and Sherwood Numbers in a Monolith Reactor,” Catal. Today, 47(1–4), pp. 295–303. [CrossRef]
Norton, D. G. , and Vlachos, D. G. , 2004, “ A CFD Study of Propane/Air Microflame Stability,” Combust. Flame, 138(1–2), pp. 97–107. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic illustration of rotary recuperative type catalytic combustion reactor: 1—ULCVG inlet, 2—gas outlet, 3—exhaust gas inlet, and 4—exhaust gas outlet

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of the computational model: State I (solid line): 1—ULCVG inlet, 2—gas outlet, 3—exhaust gas inlet, and 4—exhaust gas outlet. State II (dotted line): 1—exhaust gas outlet, 2—exhaust gas inlet, 3—gasoutlet, and 4—ULCVG inlet.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Verification of model: ignition temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Variation of outlet temperature in one period

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Change of methane conversion rate in one period

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Axis profiles of temperature and Nu on the combustion side t = 10 s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Distribution of temperature and Nu on the heat side along the axis t = 10 s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Vertical profile of gas temperature t = 10 s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Vertical profile of methane conversion t = 10 s

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Distribution of wall temperature on the combustion side along the axis

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Distribution of wall temperature on the heat side along the axis

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In