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Research Papers: Fuel Combustion

Transient Cold Flow Simulation of Fast Fluidized Bed Fuel Reactors for Chemical-Looping Combustion

[+] Author and Article Information
Mengqiao Yang

Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Materials Science,
Washington University in St. Louis,
1 Brookings Drive,
St. Louis, MO 63130
e-mail: mengqiao@wustl.edu

Subhodeep Banerjee

Multiphase Flow Science Group,
National Energy Technology Laboratory,
3610 Collins Ferry Road,
Morgantown, WV 26505
e-mail: subhodeep.banerjee@netl.doe.gov

Ramesh K. Agarwal

Department of Mechanical Engineering
and Materials Science,
Washington University in St. Louis,
1 Brookings Drive,
St. Louis, MO 63130
e-mail: rka@wustl.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 16, 2017; final manuscript received January 31, 2018; published online June 26, 2018. Editor: Hameed Metghalchi.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 140(11), 112203 (Jun 26, 2018) (7 pages) Paper No: JERT-17-1169; doi: 10.1115/1.4039415 History: Received April 16, 2017; Revised January 31, 2018

Circulating fluidized bed in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a recent technology that provides great advantage for gas–solid interaction and efficiency. In order to obtain a thorough understanding of this technology and to assess its effectiveness for industrial scale deployment, numerical simulations are conducted. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are performed with dense discrete phase model (DDPM) to simulate the gas–solid interactions. CFD commercial software ansysfluent is used for the simulations. Two bed materials of different particle density and diameter, namely the molochite and Fe100, are used in studying the hydrodynamics and particle behavior in a fuel reactor corresponding to the experimental setup of Haider et al. (2016, “A Hydrodynamic Study of a Fast-Bed Dual Circulating Fluidized Bed for Chemical Looping Combustion,” Energy Technol., 4(10), pp. 1254–1262.) at Cranfield University in the UK. Both the simulations show satisfactory agreement with the experimental data for both the static pressure and volume fraction at various heights above the gas inlet in the reactor. It is found that an appropriate drag law should be used in the simulation depending on the particle size and flow conditions in order to obtain accurate results. The simulations demonstrate the ability of CFD/DDPM to accurately capture the physics of circulating fluidized bed-based CLC process at pilot scale which can be extended to industrial scale projects.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Geometry and mesh in the upper and lower part of the fuel reactor of Haider et al. [16]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Particle tracks colored by velocity magnitude for the fast fluidized bed simulation with molochite

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Time variation of outlet mass flow rate for the fast fluidized bed simulation with molochite

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Time variation of static pressure at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with molochite

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Time variation of volume fraction at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with molochite

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison of pressure variation at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with molochite

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Comparison of volume fraction at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with molochite

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Particles tracks colored by velocity magnitude for the fast fluidized bed simulation with Fe100

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Time variation of outlet mass flow rate for the fast fluidized bed simulation with Fe100

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Time variation of static pressure at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with Fe100

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Time variation of volume fraction at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with Fe100

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Comparison of pressure variation at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with Fe100

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Comparison of volume fraction at various heights for the fast fluidized bed simulation with Fe100

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