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Research Papers: Energy From Biomass

Influence of Selected Gasification Parameters on Syngas Composition From Biomass Gasification

[+] Author and Article Information
Maan Al-Zareer

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
Clean Energy Research Laboratory,
Institute of Technology,
University of Ontario,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: maan.al-zareer@uoit.ca

Ibrahim Dincer

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
Clean Energy Research Laboratory,
Institute of Technology,
University of Ontario,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: ibrahim.dincer@uoit.ca

Marc A. Rosen

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
Clean Energy Research Laboratory,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: marc.rosen@uoit.ca

Contributed by the Advanced Energy Systems Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received July 3, 2017; final manuscript received February 18, 2018; published online March 29, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Gongnan Xie.

J. Energy Resour. Technol 140(4), 041803 (Mar 29, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: JERT-17-1324; doi: 10.1115/1.4039601 History: Received July 03, 2017; Revised February 18, 2018

In this study, the syngas composition exiting a biomass gasifier is investigated to determine the effect of varying selected gasification parameters. The gasification parameters considered are the mass flow rate of steam, the gasification agent, the mass flow rate of oxygen, the gasification oxidant, and the type of biomass. The syngas composition is represented by its hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water fractions. The oxygen fed to the gasifier is produced using a cryogenic air separation unit (CASU). The gasifier and the air separation unit are modeled and simulated with aspenplus, where the gasification reactions are carried out based on the Gibbs free energy minimization approach. Finally, the syngas composition for the different types of biomass as well as the different compositions of the three types of the biomass considered are compared in terms of chemical composition. It was found that for each type of biomass and at a specified steam flow rate there is an air to the air separation unit where the gasification of the biomass ends and biomass combustion starts and as the volatile matter in the biomass increases the further the shifting point occur, meaning at higher air flow rate. It was found for the three considered biomass types and their four mixtures that, as the volatile matter in the biomass increases, more hydrogen is observed in the syngas. An optimum biomass mixture can be achieved by determining the right amount of each type of biomass based on the reported sensitivity analysis.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

aspenplus flow sheet of the CASU and the Gibbs free energy minimization approach of the gasification process

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic diagram, of the biomass gasifier and the CASU

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Variation of syngas main chemical constituents including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water with oxygen and steam feed to the gasifier, for the case when bamboo wood is fed to the gasifier

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Variation of syngas main chemical constituents including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water with oxygen and steam feed to the gasifier, for the case when corn straw is fed to the gasifier

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Variation of syngas main chemical constituents including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water with oxygen and steam feed to the gasifier, for the case when rice husk is fed to the gasifier

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Variation of hydrogen content for the three considered biomass types with four mixtures of these biomass types at a steam mass flow rate to feed ratio of 5 and oxygen to feed ratio variation from 0 to 10

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Variation of the energy efficiency with oxygen and steam feed to the gasifier, for the case when bamboo wood is fed to the gasifier

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