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research-article

In-Cylinder Spray and Combustion Investigations in a Heavy-Duty Optical Engine Fueled with Waste Cooking Oil, Jatropha and Karanja Biodiesels

[+] Author and Article Information
Chetankumar Patel

Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016, India
chetanpatel.iitk@gmail.com

Joonsik Hwang

Engine Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon, South Korea
ippo@kaist.ac.kr

Krishn Chandra

Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016, India
kchandraiitk@gmail.com

Rashmi A. Agarwal

Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016, India
rashmi.a.agarwal@gmail.com

Choongsik Bae

Engine Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon, South Korea
csbae@kaist.ac.kr

Tarun Gupta

Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016, India
tarun@iitk.ac.in

Dr. Avinash Kumar Agarwal

Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016, India
akag@iitk.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040579 History: Received May 02, 2018; Revised June 09, 2018

Abstract

In this experimental study, spray and combustion characterization inside the single cylinder optical engine were done by varying fuel injection pressures (40, 80 and 120 MPa). Karanja, Jatropha and Waste cooking oil biodiesels were utilized as test fuels and results were compared with conventional diesel. There was no significant difference observed in spray tip penetration amongst the test fuels. However, spray angle were found to be slightly wider for biodiesels. Mineral diesel showed relatively shorter injection delay than biodiesels at fuel injection pressure of 40 and 80 MPa. Jatropha and Karanja biodiesels showed higher flame luminosity at all fuel injection pressures, while waste cooking oil biodiesel showed lower flame luminosity, especially at higher fuel injection pressure of 80 and 120 MPa due to comparatively lower fuel viscosity amongst biodiesels. Flame spatial fluctuation (FSF) and flame non-homogeneity (FNH) were higher for biodiesels at lower fuel injection pressure of 40 MPa. Karanja and Jatropha biodiesels also showed higher FSF and FNH at higher injection pressures, while Waste cooking oil biodiesel showed lower FSF and FNH at higher fuel injection pressures.

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