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Accepted Manuscript
Article Type: Guest Editorial
J Biomech Eng.
Paper No: BIO-23-1006
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Journal Articles
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Kinematic model used for the joint coordinate system of Grood and Suntay [ ...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 1 Kinematic model used for the joint coordinate system of Grood and Suntay [ 1 ]. The model is comprised of a chain of three cylindric joints which allow six degree-of-freedom motions. Two rotations (F–E and I–E) and translations (M–L and C–D) occur about and along the body-fixed F–E and I–E ... More
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Body-fixed Cartesian coordinate systems for a right knee for the ISB (gray ...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 2 Body-fixed Cartesian coordinate systems for a right knee for the ISB (gray arrows) and FUNC (dark arrows) joint coordinate systems: ( a ) Femur and ( b ) Tibia. Note that since the origins of the femoral and tibial Cartesian coordinate systems coincide for the ISB, the origin of the tibial ... More
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Process for defining the body-fixed F–E axes for the ISB and FUNC joint coo...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 3 Process for defining the body-fixed F–E axes for the ISB and FUNC joint coordinate systems (JCS). ( a ) The sagittal plane (gray) was defined as the plane in which the posterior femoral condyles were superimposed. The same transformation to orient the femur in the sagittal plane was applied... More
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Process for defining the 0 deg reference using the femoral and tibial mecha...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 4 Process for defining the 0 deg reference using the femoral and tibial mechanical axes in the sagittal plane. ( a ) The femoral mechanical axis (solid) was the line that extended from the most distal point of the trochlear groove and was rotated 3 deg about that distal point from a line alon... More
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Process for finding the body-fixed I–E axis of the ISB JCS. ( a ) The coron...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 5 Process for finding the body-fixed I–E axis of the ISB JCS. ( a ) The coronal view (left) was perpendicular to the sagittal plane (far right) and was the view in which the line (dashed) joining the midpoint of the tibia at the joint line to the point at the center of the shaft 10 cm below t... More
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Process for finding the body-fixed I–E axis of the FUNC JCS. ( a ) The axia...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 6 Process for finding the body-fixed I–E axis of the FUNC JCS. ( a ) The axial plane (gray background) was the plane connecting the end points of the major axis of the lateral tibial compartment (black dots) and the point on the medial edge of the tibia (white dot). ( b ) The origin of the ti... More
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Mean rotations as a function of flexion angle for the two joint coordinate ...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 7 Mean rotations as a function of flexion angle for the two joint coordinate systems. Error bars represent ± one standard deviation. The maximum absolute mean V–V rotation was limited to 1.1 deg with the FUNC JCS whereas the mean was 3.9 deg for the ISB JCS which is nonphysiologic. The V–V ro... More
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Mean translations as a function of flexion angle for the two joint coordina...
Published Online: January 23, 2023
Fig. 8 Mean translations as a function of flexion angle for the two joint coordinate systems. Error bars represent ± one standard deviation. Patterns differed significantly between the ISB JCS and the FUNC JCS for all three translations. Magnitudes of C–D translations generated with the ISB JCS we... More
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